Greg's Cool Storm Pix

 

NOTICE: All the images contained within this document are copyrighted. Unauthorized reproduction, by any means (including electronic), without Greg's permission is a violation of the copyright.

 


© 1989 Greg Stumpf
This is my first supercell tornado, and first tornado of my Oklahoma-based chases. It occurred on May 13, 1989 over open ranch land in Wilbarger County, Texas. Even though we reported it to the local NWS office, and captured it on video and stills, it never made it to Storm Data! 
© 1992 Greg Stumpf
This picture was taken on 9/7/92 at the FAA academy in Oklahoma City. It is the TDWR radome with a severe thunderstorm anvil 150 miles away! 
© 1991 Greg Stumpf
Here's an F3 tornado that occured near Hillsdale (and Kremlin), Oklahoma on April 12, 1991. This picture is entitled "The Bird Cage", as the cloud structure in the multi-tiered wall cloud and tornado resembled one. The tornado was photographed at the same site that the OU Portable Doppler Radar team (Bluestein, et al.) was located. This was the 5th of 6 tornadoes that this slow-moving supercell produced. 
© 1991 Greg Stumpf
This was an unratable tornado (occurred over open range land) in Cimarron County, Oklahoma on May 11, 1991, about 17 miles north of Boise City. We chased the storm for 3 1/2 hours before it started rotating (it was a high-based microburst producer for a long time). Our team managed to get closer than anyone else (besides maybe some prairie critters), being about 1 1/2 miles to its east on the closest paved road (Route 287). 
© 1991 Greg Stumpf
Here's another tornado I photographed on May 26, 1991 (ah, what a year!). This is near Mooreland, OK, and was an F3. The red dust in the foreground is caused by the rear-flank downdraft. 
© 1990 Greg Stumpf
Here are some 3-4" hailstones we found a few miles west of Canton, Oklahoma on May 15, 1990 (the day Stillwater, Oklahoma got hit with an F3). The storm produced even bigger stones (one 6" in diameter was also photographed by another chaser). 
© 1992 Greg Stumpf
This is one of the aftermaths of the Norman windstorm of early morning Sept. 6, 1992. About 18 light aircraft were destroyed, along with F0-F1 damage to the Norman NWS Forecast Office, across the street from NSSL. Yep, I was in the middle of the 100 mph winds, and it scared the crap outta me. The cause?...a low-level Boundary Layer Vortex (BLV) along the leading edge of a bow echo thunderstorm (see Stumpf and Burgess, 1993 AMS Radar Conf.). 
© 1994 Greg Stumpf
This is the large tornado that formed on the west side of the Young County, Texas storm on May 29, 1994. It touched down 4.5N of Newcastle and travelled WSW(!) for about 3 miles, and remained on the ground for 21 minutes. The VORTEX ground teams did not see this, as they were working another mesocyclone with HP characteristics to the SE of this tornado. However, the P-3 aircraft did observe the tornado, and recorded an excellent airborne Doppler radar data set. The Fort Worth, Texas, WSR-88D radar could not detect the velocity signature of the tornado, but did detect a small hook northwest of the main mesocyclone of the storm (tornado location at the "tt" in "Padgett"). Here's another picture of the rope stage
© 1992 Greg Stumpf
This is a landspout that I got to within 1/4 mile! It occurred over farm country in eastern Colorado about 2 miles east of Prospect Valley, on June 26, 1992. Note the very small funnel on the top left, with the dust tube connecting to it from the ground on the lower right. This is proof that you don't need a funnel on the ground to have a tornado! 
© 1993 Greg Stumpf
This is my first good "wedge" tornado that I was able to get photographs of. It occurred over farm country NW of Hooker, OK, on 5 May 1993. This was the third of 5 tornadoes I saw from this slow-moving storm (the 4th was also a wedge). The 5 tornadoes I saw were of a total of 9 that the storm produced. This tornado was on the ground for 33 minutes. 
© 1995 Greg Stumpf
This is the small but beautiful F1 tornado I caught near Falcon, Colorado on June 22, 1995. It was on the ground for 8 minutes and travelled about 1 1/2 miles. This shot was from about 2 miles away. I also have pictures of the developing rotating updraft. The updraft was very narrow (~3 mi diam.), but tall...thus throwing another supercell type into the spectrum (mini-supercell, but not low-topped)! Here's another picture of the tornado, a picture of the debris cloud from 1 mile away (I wanted to get close), and a picture of the updraft about one hour later with a nice horseshoe shape. Click to read my summary , and the info I sent to the SOO at NWSFO/Peublo. 
© 1995 Greg Stumpf
This is the tornado that Paul Janish and I caught near Lipscomb, Texas, on March 25, 1995. This tornado occurred about 12 miles to our WSW and the shot was taken with a 300mm zoom lens. Our surface temperature was only 58 degF! This storm had neither a Tornado Warning nor a Severe Thunderstorm Warning issued for it! 
© 1997 Greg Stumpf
The Kellerville/Lela, TX tornado of 11 June 1997. Click here for a chase summary
© 1998 Greg Stumpf
My wife (Julie) and I captured this tornado near Burden, Kansas, on June 13, 1998 (about 6:24 pm CDT).  The images are grabbed from video via Snappy.  The tornado was on the ground for at least 4 minutes before precipitation from a left-moving storm crashed into this meso and obscured our view from it.   Here is a series of pictures:
© 1994 Greg Stumpf
Sunset-lit Accas with the NSSL radar, mesonet, and WSR-88D in the foreground. 
© 1992 Greg Stumpf
Here's a sunset scene from south of Calumet, Oklahoma, in September 1992. 
© 1993 Greg Stumpf
Here's a sunset scene from south of Gila Bend, Arizona, in August 1993. 
  © 1994 Greg Stumpf
Check out this desert storm near Courdes Jct., Arizona, during August 1994. 
© 1994 Greg Stumpf
Do you want to know a great place to chase dust devils? How about the southern end of the California Central Valley! This picture was taken 10 *feet* from the base of the vortex with a 24 mm lens. The dust tube was about 600 feet high and visible from several miles. Weather conditions at the time were clear, and about 85 degrees (Sept. 1, 1994). 
© 1993 Greg Stumpf
Hey look! A wind SHEAR vane!!! 
© 1994 Greg Stumpf
Here is a VORTEX probe with a sunset-lit thunderstorm anvil in the background. This was taken on April 26, 1994, several hours after the Gainsville, Texas tornado. 
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